Priests Talk Production and Pizzagate with Stef Chura

Priests Talk Production and Pizzagate with Stef Chura Illustration by Samuel Nigrosh

This article originally appeared in AdHoc Issue 17. Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy here as well.)

Priests play with Snail Mail at Brooklyn Bazaar on January 28. Stef Chura plays with Lionlimb and Kevin Krauter at Alphaville on February 2.

Hi! My name is Stef Chura. I live in Detroit and play in a group under my own name. I was in NYC recently for a New York minute (heh... I couldn't help myself), and I got to sit down and talk with Priests, with whom we’re going on tour in February. They’re a punk band from D.C. who have been self-releasing on their own label, Sister Polygon, since 2012. Talking to the group’s four members—vocalist Katie Alice Greer, drummer Daniele Daniele, guitarist G. L. Jaguar, and bassist Taylor Mulitz—for AdHoc, I learned a little more about the ins and outs of their label and what is was like for them to record their first full-length album, Nothing Feels Natural. They also shed some light on life in D.C. during “Pizzagate” and the armed invasion of beloved local venue Comet Ping Pong, where Taylor and Daniele work.

Stef Chura: When did you guys start Sister Polygon Records?

Katie Alice Greer: We started Sister Polygon to put out the first Priests seven-inch, in 2012. We wanted to own the means of production for putting out our music as much as we could. We all bond over music together, so the idea was to also put other stuff we really love out in the world.

Did Sister Polygon immediately grow into this bigger thing?

Daniele Daniele: It’s grown in spurts. First, it was just our stuff, then Downtown Boys, Shady Hawkins... And then around the time Pinkwash’s Your Cure Your Soil came out, in 2014, we were like, “We’re gonna be a label that does lots of stuff.” So we figured out how to distribute music, do press for releases, and things like that.

Katie: Before we would be like, “We made a cassette!”

Taylor Mulitz: “Go team!”

Daniele: We had 300 cassettes in our closet, and we were like, “We’re a record label!”

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Cassette Traveler is out January 27 on Fire Talk Records.

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1. The mantra is manifested as a sonic force

2. The mantra has lost its semantic quality

3. The mantra’s repetition becomes comfortable, familiar, and reassuring

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Bye Bye Berta is out February 10 on LP via Wharf Cat Records and CS via Ramp Local.

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Xiu Xiu will tour behind their LP and head to Brooklyn Bazaar on April 6 with Dreamcrusher. Watch the video below.
 

 

 

 

 

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For the past half-decade, Priests have been an anchor of their native-D.C.’s music community, releasing music by local or otherwise likeminded bands like Snail Mail, Downtown Boys, as well as Priests-related side projects including Flasher and Gauche, via their label Sister Polygon. After releasing their excellent Bodies and Control and Money and Power with Don Giovanni, the band is gearing up to release their debut full-length, Nothing Feels Natural through their own label. The album’s title track channels the urgency that’s characterized their previous music through a dizzying melodic arc to create a bracing anthem about the struggle to realize yourself against seemingly irresistible forces.

 

Listen to “Nothing Feels Natural” below. The record is due out January 27 via Sister Polygon Records. Priests will be kicking off a tour in support of the record with an anti-fascist benefit concert in DC on the day of the inauguration. They’ll be performing in New York with Snail Mail at Brooklyn Night Bazaar on January 28.

 

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The band will take their high-energy act across North America this spring, playing a handful of pre-release dates including at set at this year's Noise Pop Festival in San Francisco on February 22 and shows during SXSW before kicking off their tour on April 5. Diet Cig will head to NYC early in their cross-country trek, hitting up Baby's All Right for two back-to-back shows on April 7.

Listen to "Tummy Ache" below.

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Themes for Dying Earth is due out February 10 via FLORA.
 

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Listen to “Tour” below. The Courtneys II is out February 27 via Flying Nun.
 

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Voids is due out March 3 via Suicide Squeeze Records.

 

Dougie Poole Takes Americana Into the Modern Age

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"Less Young but as Dumb" is taken from Poole's forthcoming LP Wideass Highway, out February 17 on JMC Aggregate. Poole is playing a record release show that day at Shea Stadium, Brooklyn, with Wolvves; tickets are here.