Slowing Down with Snail Mail

Slowing Down with Snail Mail Illustration by Anna True

A lot has changed for Lindsey Jordan since she played her first show in 2015, assembling an ad hoc crew to open for Priests and Sheer Mag at a festival. Snail Mail’s jangly, introspective sound—layered with the Ellicot City, Maryland native’s carefully constructed lyrics—belies the band’s spontaneous origins. In a little under three years, they’ve released an EP on Priest’s Sister Polygon label, toured the United States, and signed to a major indie—all while Lindsey was finishing up high school. Ahead of Snail Mail’s debut studio album, which is due out on Matador this summer, she spoke to us about being a feminist musician, balancing schoolwork with touring, and growing up. 
What inspired you to start playing music?
I don't know—it's just a hobby. I started playing guitar when I was five, and I didn't start writing songs until I was 12 or 13. I recorded an EP on Apple Garageband a really long time ago that's not on the internet anymore, and I formed a live band to play this one show—just for fun. Then we recorded the EP, Habit, because we had some friends that were willing to help us with it. Originally, our goal was to do these five or six songs, or whatever. I mean, I never really intended for it to go well, you know? 
What's the scene like in Baltimore? Was there any particular show or band or space that was really inspiring to you?
I hung out a lot at Black Cat in DC. I saw a lot of punk bands there, and I feel like that world was pretty encouraging as far as starting your own band. I don't know about now, but there are a lot of really great record stores in Baltimore. Celebrated Summer in Hampden is where I discovered a lot of the punk music I really love now.
DC is a really big place for punk. It's a really big creative hub, with a lot of DIY spaces, and there are a lot of young people doing awesome stuff. I have some friends who play in punk bands in Baltimore. I think [Baltimore has] got a culture of people who work really hard and think outside the box.
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Photo Gallery: Idles at Ceremony

Photo Gallery: Idles at Ceremony

Last week, UK-based post-punk band Idles played a sold out show at Ceremony. Check out some sweaty, action-packed snaps of the show by photographer Nick Karp below. 

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Photo Gallery: Secret Circle at Market Hotel

Photo Gallery: Secret Circle at Market Hotel Photos by Nick Karp

Last Wednesday March 7th, Secret Circle (WIKI, Antwon, Lil Ugly Mane) played their second crazy Brooklyn show this month at Market Hotel. Nick Karp was there to capture the magic – check out his images below.



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Join the AdHoc Street Team!

Join the AdHoc Street Team!

Do you love going to see live music in NYC? Wanna spread the word about awesome AdHoc events in your neighborhood? You're in luck! 

We are on the look-out for passionate volunteers to join our street team to help distribute posters, handbills, and our monthly print zine at various locations in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. Each member must be willing to drop off promo materials at around 10 or more small local businesses aroud town. 

Earn free tickets to our events including sold-out shows, parties, and events each time you help distribute promotional materials! If you are interested in joining us, apply HERE.

Big White's "How Did You Find Out" is a Hilarious Ode to the 80s

Big White's Photography by Jordanne Chant

Australian indie outfit Big White’s “How Did You Find Out” is a humorous ode to the 80s complete with thick-framed glasses, awkward mullets, and mom jeans. The video’s grainy, VHS aesthetics are a perfect pair with the upbeat, synth-driven, New Wave-inspired track. 
The band got their start after they were spotted by Burger Records scouts at a pub in Sydney. Following their debut album On + On, the band went on a nine-week tour across their native Australia, Europe, and North America. Their newest video, ”How Do You Find Out,” reflects the band’s DIY ethos. Using inexpensive materials and the help of their friends, Big White explores themes of misconception and failure. 
"Our approach to everything is to do it yourself. With a little help from friends along the way, we tend to take things into our own hands,” Big White’s Jack T. Wotton tells AdHoc over email. “We are playing with the idea that it doesn't matter what you say, it's what you do. There's no truth in stories, and that's all the more reason to tell them."
The band is currently gearing up for their sophomore album, Street Talk, out via Modern Sky on March 30. They play Berlin on March 9 and Alphaville on March 10. Watch “How Did You Find Out” below. 

AdHoc Issue 25 Features Bill Orcutt and Snail Mail's Lindsey Jordan

AdHoc Issue 25 Features Bill Orcutt and Snail Mail's Lindsey Jordan Artwork by Taylor Mulitz

AdHoc Issue 25 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link.

Howdy, pardners! God, we’re so sorry we said “howdy” and “pardners”; it’s SxSW time again, and we’re excited. Last year, after our yearly showcase at Cheer Up Charlies, we snuck away from the bustle of Dirty Sixth Street and hit the Broken Spoke, a legendary country dancehall with an entire room dedicated to the cowboy hats of the rich and famous. Between glugs of Lone Star, we caught a set from The Derailers, one of the greatest and loudest honky-tonk bands of our time. They covered Buck Owens, they covered The Beatles, they played songs about heartbreak and hangovers, and we tried to dance along with the regulars and failed miserably. That spirit of discovery and possibility defines the SxSW experience, no matter how many stages get sponsored by Doritos.

This year, if you’re looking for something off the beaten path, we’ll be back at Cheer Up Charlies on Red River, putting on two nights of shows on two stages, featuring sets from Snail Mail and Flasher—two artists featured in this zine—as well as HOVVDY, Sudan Archives, A Place to Bury Strangers, Sammus, and Ought. We’ll see you at HOVVDY, pardners, and we’ll try to keep the puns at a minimum.

AdHoc 25's contributors:

Taylor Mulitz is a freelance designer and the guitarist and vocalist of Flasher. He designed this issue’s cover.

Anna True is a food-motivated graphic designer and illustrator. She made the illustrations for this zine.

Jeff Rosenstock is an up-and-coming songwriter from NYC. He penned this issue’s advice column.

Look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. There will also be copies at our SxSW showcases at Cheer Up Charlies. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well. 

Catch AdHoc at SxSW for our Unofficial and Official showcases on 3/14 & 3/16! 

On Yes and No, Anna McClellan Finds Closure

On Yes and No, Anna McClellan Finds Closure Photography by Ebru Yildiz

Growing up, Anna McClellan says she believed the only path to happiness was through external validation and a highly idealized version of romantic love. After a particularly difficult break up, McClellan drove from her hometown of Omaha to Los Angeles, hoping to gain some perspective. From Los Angeles, she drove to the Southeast, and then decided to move to New York City, where she lives now. After spending hours alone on the road, McClellan realized that in order to truly find contentedness, she needed to discover self-acceptance. 
McClellan’s recently released second record, Yes and No, is a product of that journey. The album's booming vocals, laid-back guitar riffs, and winding piano melodies reflect the artist's growth and autonomy. On "Flailing Orbits," McClellan triumpantly sings, "For the first time in a while, I'm not dying to see your smile/ I don't mind if our stars twinkling never intermingle again." Speaking with AdHoc over the phone, she describes the record as a “circle,” a representation of the closure she discovered while recording. Although her journey to New York is over and the record is out, McClellan’s not stopping anytime soon. To McClellan, a circle is endless. “It also never stops; it keeps going,” she says.
Yes and No is available now via Father/Daughter Records. You can catch the record release show with Navy Gangs, Veronica’s Band and Rats Mouth at Alphaville on March 8.
AdHoc: How do New York and Omaha compare to one another? 
Anna McClellan: I moved once [before], back in 2015. That was the first time I moved to New York. And that time, it was a lot harder [to move]. I think the hardest part [about New York] for me is the physical way that it affected my body to be in the two different places. New York is really exhausting in that way—just trying to get around everywhere. In Omaha, you drive and it takes five minutes to get anywhere that you need to go. But [in New York], there is just so much time spent commuting. I found that really hard to adjust to. It added a lot of tension in my body. 


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Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn” Will Get You Hot And Bothered

Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn” Will Get You Hot And Bothered Photography by Jacque Donaldson

In the new video for Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn,” two lovers embark on a serene, sensual forest drive, but something darker lurks beneath the surface.
"'Burn Burn Burn' is a song about how desire can easily turn into anger,” Che Houston, who represents one-half of the Brooklyn duo alongside Kevin Marksson, told AdHoc via email. “As the song’s co-writer and the video director, I wanted to expand on that theme through the music video.” 
Houston intersperses striking aerial shots of fall foliage with lustful gazes and bodies intertwining. The imagery complements the song's thundering percussion, enveloping synths, and impassioned vocals. 
“Our main character is inspired by the fiery wilderness around her—she feels powerful and sensual," Houston said. "When her gaze turns toward her partner, and he callously rejects it, it pushes her over that very thin line dividing affection and rage. Suddenly, her heightened energy is focused into anger and retaliation."
“Burn Burn Burn” is the first single off Saint Marilyn’s Tangle EP, which drops May 18 via Really Great Gum. Saint Mariyln will play their record release show at Alphaville on May 19.

FRIGS howl into the future on Basic Behavior

FRIGS Howl into the Future on Basic Behavior Photo by Chelsee Ivan

The first time I saw FRIGS live was in Boston, at the tail end of a noise rock slump. Two years of fuzzed-out basement shows and a bad habit of forgetting my earplugs at home had left me at least a dozen decibels poorer in both ears and more than a little apprehensive about standing anywhere within striking distance of a cranked amp. But the Toronto rock scene is always a good bet, and with fellow Canadians HSY on the bill as well, I tucked those plugs into my pocket and followed my heart to Club Bohemia.

It’s a wonderful thing, brushing up against the unknown, but FRIGS went and ripped a hole straight through it that night. Despite their drummer pulling a second shift with HSY that tour, the band went off, sparing no one from the all-consuming, full-body roar they create on stage. Now that they’ve released their debut LP, Basic Behavior, you can get a taste of it off-stage as well.

The sound is tightly-wound, but deeply emotive. FRIGS hurl themselves at the wall of existential frustration, at times maintaining a stately post-punk pulse, occasionally erupting into frantic, borderline psychedelic hysterics as guitars, vocals, and drums lash out in panic-attack waves of delicious noise. From the ping-ponging slapback and measured thump of opener “Doghead,” to the slow inferno vibe-out of closer “Trashyard,” FRIGS aren’t here for your complacency. Basic Behavior is a record of action, a taste of what’s possible when you get up and do the damn thing. 

Ahead of their show at Alphaville on March 3 with Bambara, Weeping Icon, Reverent, and Dean Cercone, AdHoc spoke to vocalist Bria Salmena about the record and misguided attempts to classify their ferocious sound.


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AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Summer 2018

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Summer 2018

AdHoc is seeking both events and editorial interns to work in our Brooklyn office. All candidates must live in the New York area and be available 12-20 hours per week starting mid-May and ending in mid-August.

Editorial internship tasks include assisting with copy-editing, fact-checking, research, CMS, social media, conducting artist interviews, writing contribution, and zine distribution. 

Event internship tasks include ticket counts, social media management, handling music submissions, fact-checking, using Photoshop/video editing software, building marketing plans, zine distribution, and, after some training, show booking. You should have excellent research skills, a laptop, and familiarity with the local music scene. The ability to gain school credit for the internship is strongly preferred but not required.

For consideration, please specify which internship you'd like to apply for in your cover letter, and submit your resume, 2 writing samples, and a list of your top 5 albums and tracks of 2018 (so far) in an email to with the subject line “SUMMER INTERNSHIP 2018″ by March 20th.

We look forward to hearing from you.